Posts Tagged ‘wasabi’

Wasabi Deviled Eggs

Wasabi Deviled Eggs

Wasabi Deviled Eggs

I was so inspired by a some wasabi deviled eggs I recently ate at a Tank Bar (at Friday, Saturday, Sunday) happy hour, that I decided to make 3 dozen deviled eggs for a reception at work. Pictured above are wasabi deviled eggs (marked with a green wasabi dot), and curry deviled eggs. While I love all deviled eggs (I could easily eat a dozen snuck off a potluck table), the wasabi variation is my favorite.

Wasabi Deviled Eggs

makes 24 halves

1 dozen large eggs

2 Tbs. mayo ( I use light mayo)

1 Tbs. brown mustard

1.5 Tbs. wasabi paste

salt and pepper, to taste

Peeled eggs in a bowl

Peeled eggs in a bowl

Boil a dozen eggs for 7 minutes, or until the yolks are very firm.  Run the eggs under cold water until cool to the touch, and peel (this is the hardest part). Slice each egg lengthwise, and with a small spoon, scoop out the yolk and place in a bowl.  Repeat with all 24 egg halves. Gently rinse each egg half, taking care not to tear the walls of the egg white “boats,”   and place on a tea towel to dry.

Egg white "boats" post-rinse

Egg white "boats" post-rinse

Add the mayonnaise, mustard, wasabi paste, and salt and pepper to the yolk bowl and mash with a potato ricer, pastry cutter, or a large folk, stirring occasionally until you have a thick, yet fluffy paste. If the mixture seems to dry, add more mayo or mustard. Scoop the paste into a pastry bag or Ziploc bag, and cut a hole in the corner of the bag.

Plate the egg white “boats” – because I don’t have a deviled egg tray I like to plate them on a bed of arugula, to prevent slipping and sliding. Pipe the yolk paste into each egg white “well.” Garnish egg wasabi egg half (especially if you are serving them with a egg variation that has less kick) with a small dollop of wasabi on top.

Korean-Style Cucumber Salad with Soy and Ginger, on Romaine

Korean-Style Cucumber Salad with Soy and Ginger

Korean-Style Cucumber Salad with Soy and Ginger

The secret to this cucumber salad from How to Cook Everything is to peel the cucumbers, scrape out the seeds inside before slicing them, and then let them drain, salted, in a colander before rinsing. I used the Korean-style variation, adding chili sesame oil.

The recipe is for the dressed cucumbers alone, but I laid them on a bed of very thinly sliced Romaine and dressed the salad with the remaining cucumber marinade. For added crunch, color and kick and I sprinkled on a handful of wasabi-crusted,  multi-color soybeans that I bought at an Amish market in Harrisonburg, VA.

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