Eggplant Delight.

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A simple, pureed dish of grilled eggplant, fried lightly with an egg, sprinkled with coriander and lime juice. It’s simple, easy, and delicious on toast or as a side with rice.

I used these interesting round, green asian eggplants that have a very mild flavor, but are also full of small round seeds, which add another textural component to the dish.

3 medium asian eggplants or 1 large Mediterranean eggplant (about one pound). If you use a Mediterranean eggplant, it will need to be salted and soaked to remove bitterness). This recipe comes from Burma: Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid .

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Eggplant Delight 

1 large egg

1.5 Tbs shallot or peanut oil

1/4 tsp. turmeric

1 dried red chile, broken

1 small shallot, minced

3/4 tsp. salt, to taste.

2 Tbs. chopped coriander

1 lime, wedged

While it may be tempting to skip the lime and cilantro, please don’t. They really make the dish!  Prick the eggplants with a fork, and place them in an oven-safe dish, roasted at 450 until the skins collapse and the eggplants are very soft. Slice the eggplants open and scoop the flesh into a bowl, then smash well with a pastry cutter or fork. Stir in the egg into the mixture well, until the yoke completely separates.

Heat the oil in a wok, then add the oil, and stir in the numeric. Add the chili and shallot and cook, stirring constantly, for about 15 seconds. Add the eggplant mixture and continue to stir, scraping the sides and bottom of the wok, and keeping the eggplant mixture soft and smooth, for about 1 minutes. Add the salt, stir, taste, and add more salt of necessary. Turn the eggplant into a shallow bowl, top with cilantro and a healthy squeeze of lime juice.

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Steamed Eggplant with Miso-Tomato Sauce

steamed eggplant with miso-tomato sauce

I bought some adorable little asian eggplants, and there they lay, lingering in my fridge, waiting for me to make myself a dinner. I love asian varieties of eggplant, as they tend to be more tender, and less bitter than their larger, Italian cousins. With not much time or desire to put together a large meal for just myself, and even less desire to spend time over the stove on a sweltering 98 degree Philadelphia day, I pulled a recipe from Joe Yohan’s very fun cookbook, “Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook.” All recipes in this cookbook are vegetable-based, and intended for solo meals.  Not too many ingredients, not to much time, but a whole lot of flavor.

I altered the recipe a bit to use what I had available – some homemade Coconut Vinegar that my friend Joel gave me (and warned me to open quickly, as the yeast was still alive!) and some roasted almonds instead of peanuts. I also used the same pan and boiling water which I used to steam the eggplant for boiling the udon noodles. Less time – less mess! Altogether, about 6 minutes of total hands-on cooking, and a great, quick dinner.

A brief recipe summary, with my alterations:

 

Steamed Eggplant with Miso-Tomato Sauce 

One small eggplant, or a few tiny asian eggplants. Slice into rounds, salt, and steam until soft (about 20 minutes)

A nice hunk of ginger, diced, and cooked in 2 teaspoons of sesame oil until soft

2 Tbs. of miso, whisked with 1 Tbs. of vinegar (I used homemade coconut vinegar). Add the miso sauce to the ginger, stir.

A big diced tomato, or 3/4 cup organic crushed tomatoes, or tomato sauce. Added to the sauce.

1 serving of cooked udon noodles (or soba). Top the noodles with the eggplants and the sauce, and then garnish with chopped almonds (or peanuts, or roasted sesame seeds) and diced scallion.