10 fruits and vegetables a day

In general, and especially in the summer, when I have all the goodness of fresh vegetables from my CSA and garden, I aim for 10 servings of fruits and vegetables a day. I know that sounds insane, but the latest dietary guideline call for 5-13 servings a day. I feel like 10 is a great goal, and if I’m I’m cooking for myself, it’s not that hard to do.

Lots of people squeeze in extra servings through juicing. While I like juice and juicing, I want to make sure to get the benefits of all that healthy fiber, too. I aim for 1-3 fruit servings for breakfast, and then 3-4 veggie servings for lunch, another fruit in the afternoon, and a few more veggies for dinner! The above collection of salads is what I had for lunch today:
1 small zuchini, julienned
1 small summer squash, juilienned
about 10 tiny heirloom tomatoes, halved
with red wine vinegar, olive oil and sea salt

a pile of pickled red cabbage salad from Hummus
a pile of red beet salad from Hummus (a local Mediterranean take-out spot)

The best thing about this collection of salads (besides the taste) is all the different colors (and vitamins and minerals) and flavors. And let me tell you, it’s taking me forever to eat!

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Guatemala, Desayuno

Chicken Bus
Chicken Bus

I’ve returned from Guatemala, and am still adjusting to the cold, rainy weather of Philadelphia. While the above photo isn’t of food, the “chicken bus” or public bus is commonly used to transport food from villages to town markets, and then back again, either inside the bus or in large baskets attached to the racks on top. The above bus is in the market at Antigua, and heads to San Lucas.

Desayuno Tipica
Desayuno Tipica

Breakfast is the easiest meal for vegetarian in Guatemala. The desayuno tipica, or typical breakfast, consists of eggs (in some style), black beans, fried plantains, cheese (though I got the above breakfast, at Las Brisas comedor in Santiago Atitlan, with guacemole instead).

Huevos Revueltos
Huevos Revueltos

Scrambled eggs, especially with tomato and onion, are called Huevos Revueltos. And fried potatoes in Guate are not messing around. Just look at those hunks of deep-fried goodness. Serves with salsa, and Senor Lanky’s singular “side” of bacon.

Huevos Rancheros
Huevos Rancheros

Huevos Rancheros, or Mexican-style eggs, are usually just fried eggs served with a side of tomato salsa, and not at all spicy. You have to add your own chili sauce, and I added it plentifully. Shown here shaded by a palm tree at a little place called Posada de Jabailito in Jabailito, Lake Atitlan.

Desayuno mas typica
Desayuno mas typica

I ordered this very basic breakfast at a small food stand in the center of the Sunday market at ChiChicastenango. Just beans, scrambled eggs and rice with salsa, and of course, fresh corn tortillas. And sweet, instant coffee. Delicious, and around $1.20.

Crepes
Crepes

More exciting, these crepes (which are very popular in Guatemala, perhaps due to the international expat scene) were served to me at La Iguana Perdida in Santa Cruz. Sweet, and stuffed with black beans, eggs, and cheese (are you picking up on a theme yet?)

Macademia Nut Pancakes
Macademia Nut Pancakes

Guatemalans LOVE pancaques, or pancakes. We hiked two hours outside of Antigua to Valhalla, and experimental macadamia nut plantation, for the beauties. Studded with nuts, topped with fresh macadamia nut butter and blueberries, and served with a side of fresh papaya, they were worth it.

Blue Corn Pancakes
Blue Corn Pancakes

The hotel Posada de Santiago in Santiago Atitlan is famous for their blue corn pancakes, and rightly so. I ordered two of these beauties, served with macademia nut syrup, and two fried eggs, which, alongside a bowl of fresh fruit, got me through a long drive to Guatemala City. Notice how orange the yolks of the eggs are. It’s called free-range, and not corn-fed, and infinitely more tasty.

Fruit Bowl
Fruit Bowl

The fruit, especially the papaya, bananas and fresh pineapple, are out this world. I miss it already.