Singapore Kosher Vegetarian

cold sesame noodles and spring roll
cold sesame noodles and spring roll

I organized our office holiday party at Singapore Kosher Vegetarian. Not only do they offer an overwhelming, all kosher vegetarian dim sum meal for only $10, they are also a BYOB, which I love. We arrive with almost 30 people and the staff was incredibly accommodating, cheerful, and helpful. I couldn’t cover all of the different dim sum that we ate, but I captured a few. I love cold sesame noodles and these were nice and fresh tasting and not over-sauced. The spring rolls are what you would expect – greasy and filled with cabbage, but I’m sucker for spicy mustard sauce.

"chicken" drumsticks
"chicken" drumsticks

Singapore has worked hard to make their “chicken” drumsticks as realistic as possible. From the crispy outer skin, the moist, fibrous insides and the “bone” skewer that runs down the center, these drumsticks were so close to the real thing that some of our vegetarian group couldn’t quite make themselves take a bite while the carnivorous members of our group were a bit freaked out. I thought they were delicious, and I love the tangy sauce that comes on top.

vegetable buns
vegetable buns

I usually avoid buns during a big dim sum meal because they are so doughy and expand in your stomach, though I know that they are some folks’ favorites.

tofu with peanut sauce
tofu with peanut sauce

Deep-fried tofu with peanut sauce and sesame seeds. Need I say more?

I missed photos of the vegetable, tofu and “pork” soup, fried curry dumplings, the “beef” and leek dumplings, Singapore potato latkes and, of course, the orange slices and fortune cookies. Take your meat-eating friends to Singapore and surprise them with how good fake meat can be. And if you’ve got a private party, be sure to ask for the room on the 2nd floor with the karaoke machine!

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Tangarine Tofu

Baked Tangarine Tofu from <em>Veganomicon</em>
Baked Tangarine Tofu from Veganomicon
I had a few extra tangarines in the kitchen, and decided to make the Tangarine Tofu from Veganomicon. Their recipe calls for a pretty meager amount of tangarine zest, so of course I added more. While they would have you bake the tofu in its marinade for about 45 minutes, which I did, it ends up looking like this: I wanted a bit more flavor and carmelization, so I pan-fried the tofu in just a bit of seseme oil, adding the remaining marinade as a glaze. I served the tofu, as per usual, with a small bed of brown rice.
fried Tangarine Tofu with baby bok choy
fried Tangarine Tofu with baby bok choy

Senor Lanky (the bf) prepared the baby bok choy by frying 8 (!) cloves of garlic in peanut oil, adding the boy choy until it wilted slightly, then reducing a marinade of soy, seseme oil, rice wine vinegar, and touch of corn starch. He called it “bok choy with garlic” and was very proud of himself.